Tampilkan posting dengan label Potato. Tampilkan semua posting
Tampilkan posting dengan label Potato. Tampilkan semua posting
  Syracuse Salt Potatoes – Lot's Wife Would Have Loved These

Syracuse Salt Potatoes – Lot's Wife Would Have Loved These

Not only is this Syracuse salt potatoes recipe one of the most delicious ways to cook baby spuds, it’s also one of the most interesting. I generally don’t like when people watch me cook their food, you know, in case anything gets dropped (#5secondrule), but these are kind of fun to do in front of guests; just to see that look of shock in their eyes, as you dump in all that salt. Amazingly, only a small amount of salt gets inside the potatoes, and by “small amount,” I mean “perfect amount.” 

This recipe really takes the guesswork out of seasoning. Of course, I could go into all the science behind why these don’t absorb too much salt, but that would mean having to learn it first, and then figure out how to explain it, which sounds like an awful lot of work. Instead, I’ll let my intrepid readers take wild guesses.

I mention in the video that these were invented by Irish salt miners, which is true, except I don’t think they used actual mines, but salt pools instead. Apparently digging is a lot harder than waiting for water to evaporate. Regardless, they used this abundant supply of salt to boil less-than-perfect quality new potatoes, and the rest is culinary history.

Regarding the amount of salt, I used a ratio of 1 cup of kosher salt to 5 cups of water. Believe it or not, this is actually less than traditionally used. Hey, we all don’t have salt factories in our backyards. A cup of the brand I use weighs about 6 ounces, which means if you’re using regular, fine table salt, you’ll need just over a half-cup to get the same amount of salt.

Anyway, other than having to sponge-up some salt speckles from the stovetop, this recipe is fast, easy, and truly unique. So, if you want to serve something this St. Paddy’s Day that truly celebrates Irish-American heritage, then I hope you give these salt potatoes a try. Enjoy!



Ingredients for 6 servings:
2 pounds of small new potatoes, scrubbed
5 cups of water
1 cup Kosher salt
melted butter
Duck Fat Steak Fries – There’s a New Fat in Town

Duck Fat Steak Fries – There’s a New Fat in Town

You know a potato side dish is going to be good when 75% of the name refers to fat or meat. These super-crusty, oven-fried potato wedges, or “steak fries” as they call them where I’m from, are done with rendered duck fat, and while I’m a big fan of ones done with olive oil and/or butter, these really are better.

Not only does this fat help create a great texture, but it also adds a layer of richness and meatiness to the potatoes that’s nothing short of magical. Back in the day, you had to work or eat in a restaurant that served duck to enjoy this special treat, but happily, those days are over.

Thanks to evangelizing celebrity chefs and apparently smarter marketing people in the duck industry, this rendered fat is now pretty easy to find. My neighborhood Whole Foods stocks it, and I’ve seen it at many of the higher-end grocery stores.

By the way, if you’re concerned about that next cholesterol test, relax; duck fat is surprisingly healthy, and a quick Google search should explain why without me having to type any more. I hope you give these a try soon. Enjoy!


Ingredients for 4 portions:
2 large russet potatoes
2-3 tablespoons duck fat
salt and pepper to taste
pinch of cayenne
1 tbsp minced fresh thyme leaves
- 325 F. for 40 minutes
- 450 F. for about 20 minutes or until done
Potato & Parsnip Gratin – Less Parsnips is More Parsnips

Potato & Parsnip Gratin – Less Parsnips is More Parsnips

Parsnips are a nutritious, uniquely delicious root vegetable, which we should all be enjoying on a much more regular basis, but I think I know the reason why we don’t. The problem with parsnips is that they taste too much like parsnips.

The earthy taste and licorice nose is almost too much when served in their pure form, but when mixed and mellowed in something like this classic potato gratin, you get a much more user-friendly way to enjoy this cheap and easy to find root. Of course, I'm sure the low-carb folks would argue, but that's only because they're irritable from the no carbs.

By the way, you can also use this same exact technique for other subterranean treats like turnips, rutabagas, and celery root. As I said in the video, while this makes a fine side dish to almost anything, it’s also a stellar brunch potato for those occasions when hash browns just don’t seem cool enough. For that, and many other reasons, I really hope you give this a try soon. Enjoy!


Ingredients for 6 portions Potato Parsnip Gratin:
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 tbsp melted butter
3 Yukon gold potatoes (about 1 1/2 pounds total)
2 smaller parsnips (about 12 ounces total)
salt and pepper to taste
1 tsp fresh thyme leaves
6 ounces (about 3/4 cup) crème fraiche, divided or heavy cream and a tsp of white vinegar)
1 cup chicken broth
2 ounces Parmigiano-Reggiano, finely grated
cayenne to taste
375 F. for 45-60 minutes
Ultimate Mashed Potatoes - Not Your Every Day Recipe

Ultimate Mashed Potatoes - Not Your Every Day Recipe

Every year around holiday time, I see people posting recipes for low-fat and no-fat mashed potatoes, which I find as sad, as I do perplexing. There’s no sane doctor alive, or bartender for that matter, who will tell you eating a scoop of these mashed potatoes a few times a year will, in any way, negatively effect your health.

So what’s up with the reduced-fat holiday potatoes? Isn’t that the reason we try to eat well all year, so on Thanksgiving we can bathe guilt-free in gravy? Sure, serving your loved ones potatoes with a pound of butter in them on a regular basis would be cause for alarm…or at least a glance at any recently purchased life insurance policies…but for truly special occasions, it’s crazy not to enjoy such a pleasure.

By the way, this is no viral-video gimmick. Those star chefs you see Anthony Bourdain dry-humping every week (sorry, I was channeling my inner Anthony Bourdain) all use at least this much butter, and as legend has it, some even flirt with equal parts. Of course, they call it pomme purée, and say it with a French accent, but it’s the same stuff.

Nobody says you have to go full Joël Robuchon and actually use this recipe, but please try to force yourself to add more than the few meager tablespoons that get us through the rest of the year. Anyway, if you’re never experienced this ethereal pleasure, I hope you make them a part of your next special occasion menu. Enjoy!


Ingredients for 8 portions:
3 1/4 pounds russet potatoes (3 or 4)
Note: this will not work with red potatoes, as they are too waxy
1 pound unsalted butter
1/4 cup hot milk
salt and pepper to taste

Note: Thanksgiving gravy warning! For obvious reasons, these aren't very sturdy mashed potatoes, so be careful with the gravy. If you totally drench them they'll basically melt.
Kicking Off Side Dish Season with Roasted “Wild” Mushroom and Potato Salad

Kicking Off Side Dish Season with Roasted “Wild” Mushroom and Potato Salad

It’s almost that time of year again. The holidays are still a little ways off, but you’re already starting to wonder (worry?) what creative side dishes will adorn the season’s holiday tables. This delicious, and very versatile roasted mushroom and potato salad could be worth a look. 

“Wild” mushrooms have never been less so, and that’s a good thing. Not that hunting for mushrooms in a dewy forest isn’t fun, but I’ll take a nice safe grocery store over actual labor anytime. Especially since the selection has gotten so much better over the years. You can easily find 5-6 varieties of mushrooms in the big markets, and they all will work.

I’ve given you an almost blank canvas here, with possible additions being as numerous as they are obvious. One geometrical change I’d make next time, would be to quarter the potatoes instead of halving them, to add surface area, as well as decreasing the cooking time.

Not only is this salad good hot, room temp, and cold, but it also works for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. I hope you give it a try soon. Enjoy!


Ingredients for 6 portions
2 tbsp olive oil, more as needed
2 lbs new yellow or red potatoes
1 lb trimmed wild mushrooms
2 oz pancetta
salt and pepper to taste
3 tbsp sherry vinegar
2 tbsp tarragon
2 garlic cloves, finely minced

Note: I roasted the potatoes at 400 F. for 30 minutes, then turned the oven up to 425 F. to finish with the mushrooms. For simplicity’s sake, just use 425 F the whole way. It’s 30 minutes for just potatoes, then about 20-30 more with the mushrooms, tossing a few times. Don’t stop until everything is looking awesome.